Academic Programs > Industrial & Engineering Technology > Welding
Welding

WELDER.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT IS WELDING?
 
Welding is the joining of materials with or without the application of heat, filler material, and/or pressure.

YOU MIGHT LIKE WELDING IF YOU:

  • Want lots of job opportunities.
  • Want good, competitive wages.
  • Like to be physically active.
  • Like to be challenged.
  • Want your work to be diversified.
  • Need to feel a sense of accomplishment.
  • Want to travel in the U.S. or abroad.
  • Take pride in your workmanship.

SKILLS NEEDED TO BECOME A WELDER:

  • Manual dexterity.
  • Good eyesight.
  • Good eye-hand coordination.
  • The ability to concentrate on detailed work for prolonged periods of time.
  • The ability to stoop, bend, climb, and work in awkward positions.
  • Patience.

TRIDENT'S PROGRAM OFFERS:

The latest welding technology as well as traditional welding skills training and a good foundation in basic welding theory, metallurgy, and blueprint reading. Safety is stressed throughout the program.

Trident's Welding program is designed to provide comprehensive welding education to new students as well as experienced welders wanting to expand their skills and/or knowledge.

EMPLOYMENT PROSPECTS AND WAGE POTENTIAL:

Close to half-million people hold jobs as welders, cutters, or welding machine operators. Approximately three fourth of them are in manufacturing and service industries. If other trades, such as boilermakers, ironworkers, and pipefitters are included, then the total climbs to about 2 million or 10% of our national workforce. In an industry valued at more than $5.5 billion, the need to replace aging, skilled welders is acute. According to Dave Manning, president of the Hobart Institute of Welding Technology, "The need for skilled welders will become more of a problem in the next three to five years, as 50% of the welders in North America retire."

Welders will be needed in manufacturing for industries such as transportation equipment, industrial machinery,  fabricated metal products. They will be found at construction sites, in repair shops and personnel supply agencies.

According to Freddy Torres, coordinator for the American Welding Society's Schools Excelling through National Skills Education, a welder's average weekly earnings were $742 in the summer of 2000. The average annual earnings for a welder is between $30,000 and $46,000 per year.

Associate Degrees 

Welding

Certificates 

Welding Gas Metal Arc and Flux Cored Arc

Welding Gas Metal Arc and Flux Cored Arc Advanced

Welding Gas Tungsten Arc

Welding Gas Tungsten Arc Advanced

Welding Shielded Metal Arc

Welding Shielded Metal Arc Advanced

Gainful Employment Disclosures 

Welding Gas Metal Arc and Flux Cored Arc Certificate

Welding Gas Tungsten Arc Certificate

Welding Shielded Metal Arc Certificate

 

Trident Technical College, Copyright 2011