Academic & Financial Aid Appeals - More Information

A. I did not do all work assigned for my classes.
Perhaps you did not or could not set aside two to three hours every week to complete work outside of class for each hour that you are in class. For example, most successful students taking 12 credit hours allow 24 to 36 hours each week to complete outside work. Committing 36 to 48 hours weekly towards your college education is equal to having a full-time job. Taking 12 credit hours is a ‘full-time’ requirement.
B. I took classes without taking the pre-requisite(s), or I believe I need to re-take the pre-requisite(s).
A “prerequisite” is a course you must take before you can enroll in a higher-level course. The TTC Catalog identifies courses that require pre-requisites. Examples: A TTC advisor told you to take MAT 032 before enrolling in MAT 101. Somehow, you were able to enroll directly in MAT 101 and then failed it. Or, you enrolled in MAT 153 in preparation for MAT 110 and passed MAT 153 with a low “C.” You discovered the faster pace of MAT 110 made the course material too challenging and you failed.
C. I need help with study skills.
Many reasons contribute to procrastination.   Developing time or stress management skills may help. These skills also involve setting priorities and learning how to get the most important things done first. Sometimes, putting off schoolwork happens when you do not know what you want to accomplish. You may know you need a college education, but you may not know your exact goals. And sometimes, personal or family problems can lead to depression. Reluctance to fully committing to a goal or plan may be signs of depression.
D. Personal or family issues prevented me from focusing on my classes in the past.
Stress, time demands, loss of income, and/or a combination of these plus the occurrence of a “life event” may cause you to perform poorly in class, withdraw from courses and/or miss an excessive number of classes. Having “recovered” from such an experience means that most, if not all, of the problems and disruptions that occurred are over. You may still have some healing to do or more adjustments to make.
E. My work schedule, child-care arrangements, transportation arrangements, or some other external factor(s) prevented me from successfully completing a full-time academic schedule.
Your personal obligations plus your full-time class schedule most likely resulted in an overload.  Your current commitments beyond college may make enrolling in a full-time academic schedule difficult.  For example, most successful students taking 12 credit hours allow 24 to 36 hours each week to complete outside work. Committing 36 to 48 hours weekly towards your college education is equal to having a full-time job. Taking 12 credit hours is a ‘full-time’ requirement.